AMD Ryzen 7000 CPUs up to 37% Faster than Ryzen 5000 in ST and MT Workloads: DDR5, PCIe Gen 5, and 5GHz Boost [Report]

AMD Ryzen 7000 CPUs up to 37% Faster than Ryzen 5000 in ST and MT Workloads: DDR5, PCIe Gen 5, and 5GHz Boost [Report]

Tom from Moore’s Law is Dead has provided another update on AMD’s CPU roadmap. According to the YouTuber, the Zen 4 lineup is on track for a late 2022 launch. Both the Ryzen 7000 and Epyc Genoa processors will support next-gen I/O including DDR5, PCIe Gen 5, as well as increased lane counts. AVX-512 support is pretty much confirmed, and the core has undergone multiple changes to enable this.

For starters, the Floating Point (FP) backend will be wider with more ALU ports and registers, along with a larger ReOrder Buffer. The L1i and L1D caches will also be beefed up to allow for a higher cache bandwidth (64B/s). The L2 cache is said to be doubled to 2MB (1MB on Zen 3) while the L3 will remain unchanged.

Thanks to the use of TSMC’s 5nm N5 process node, the boost clocks have been pushed over 5GHz for the time, across all cores. According to Tom’s sources, this contributes to a sizable 8-14% performance gain over Zen 3, especially in gaming workloads. The IPC itself will see a substantial upgrade of almost 40% (28-37%).

The Ryzen 7000 desktop processors are being prepped for a late Q3 or Q4 launch with the unveil likely scheduled for Computex 2022 (later this month). The Ryzen 7000 mobile processors, namely Dragon Range and Phoenix are slated to land in January 2023 during AMD’s CES keynote. The former will come with up to 16 cores (32 threads), and reportedly decimate Intel’s Alder Lake-HX/Raptor Lake-HX offerings. The latter will serve ultrabook-class systems with up to 8 cores (16 threads) and a TDP of 15-28W.

The Zen 5-based Ryzen processors are expected in the latter half of 2023, roughly 12-15 months after the Zen 4 family.

Source:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Main Menu